CHROMiX

Black / White Luminance

Im using a Monaco Optix to calibrate my old 19" Dell monitor, and I print with an Epson 2200. Recently Ive been noticing a slight orange tint to my prints. Re-calibrating the monitor does not get rid of the orange tint. This has recently started to happen. When I calibrate, I get the message that my Black Points are too low for an accurate measurement. Ive always got that message, but the orange tint to the prints is recent. Ive posted questions about the orange tint in an Epson forum, but got no resolution. Im beginning to wonder if I should splurge for a new monitor. I do sell prints. I have a friend with a new Epson R300 that is getting extremely heavy orange to her photos.

Below is a screen shot, or a link to a screen shot (not sure how that works in this forum, whether it will post here, or the link will need to be clicked on) of what I see from Monaco just before saving the profile. Is there anything in that screen shot that speaks to my monitor as to whether it is still good, or should be replaced?

image.pbase.com/u16/wingspar/upl … naco01.jpg

At 9:29 AM -0800 1/22/05, wingspar wrote:

Im using a Monaco Optix to calibrate my old 19" Dell monitor, and I print with an Epson 2200. Recently Ive been noticing a slight orange tint to my prints. Re-calibrating the monitor does not get rid of the orange tint. This has recently started to happen. When I calibrate, I get the message that my Black Points are too low for an accurate measurement. Ive always got that message, but the orange tint to the prints is recent. Ive posted questions about the orange tint in an Epson forum, but got no resolution. Im beginning to wonder if I should splurge for a new monitor. I do sell prints. I have a friend with a new Epson R300 that is getting extremely heavy orange to her photos.

Below is a screen shot, or a link to a screen shot (not sure how that works in this forum, whether it will post here, or the link will need to be clicked on) of what I see from Monaco just before saving the profile. Is there anything in that screen shot that speaks to my monitor as to whether it is still good, or should be replaced?

well… 60 sure is low. For lower light conditions 85-95 is recommended on CRTs

The calibration of your monitor should not affect your prints at all - unless you are color correcting on screen and then printing or comparing the prints to images on your screen in its current state.

Try printing a known-good print - something you did a while back that you liked. THEN see if there is a shift.

You aren’t using your monitor profile as your working space are you?

Regards,

Steve


o Steve Upton CHROMiX www.chromix.com
o (hueman) 866.CHROMiX


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I do all my photo processing on this monitor, and expect to see the prints looking like what I see on the monitor. Ive been very successful with that until recently. I doubt I could get any closer than what I have till my recent problems given the fact that prints are reflecting light, and the monitor is projecting light.

Ill have to wait another day to print an old print as Ive already shut everything down for the night.

Im not sure what you mean by using my monitor profile as my working space are you? I use Paint Shop Pro to process prints with, (levels, curves and USM mostly) and under color management I have the current monitor profile chosen, and I print with Qimage, and also have the current monitor profile chosen.

Having your images in a RGB working space instead of your monitor profile is a safer bet for editing, plus a possible higher quality output and easier interchange of your images with others. I don’t know if PaintShop Pro can use such color workflow.

I recommend you to switch to Adobe Photoshop CS and have a custom ICC profile for your printer-paper (I guess you don’t have one). ColorValet can do that for you.

Xavier

Paint Shop Pro is capable of color management. Here link to a screen shot of the way I have color management set up in PSP. This is my computer at work, and I don’t keep the monitor profile up, but I do at home. It is set up this way at home also. I would think that having my monitor profile current in PSP color management would be the way to go. If you look towards the top it says “Image, graphic, or text generated by: sRGB Color Space”.
i2.pbase.com/u36/wingspar/upload … lormgt.jpg

I just made some prints for a customer yesterday, and I am not happy with them. They aren’t matching what I see on my monitor, and I’m really wondering if it is because my monitor is too old to do this anymore, which is why I posted my original question with the low numbers. Prints used to match monitor just fine. This is recent. I do not have a printer profile, nor a scanner.

At 10:11 AM -0800 2/7/05, wingspar wrote:

Paint Shop Pro is capable of color management. Here link to a screen shot of the way I have color management set up in PSP. This is my computer at work, and I don’t keep the monitor profile up, but I do at home. It is set up this way at home also. I would think that having my monitor profile current in PSP color management would be the way to go. If you look towards the top it says “Image, graphic, or text generated by: sRGB Color Space”.
http://i2.pbase.com/u36/wingspar/upload/39507969.psp_colormgt.jpg

I just made some prints for a customer yesterday, and I am not happy with them. They aren’t matching what I see on my monitor, and I’m really wondering if it is because my monitor is too old to do this anymore, which is why I posted my original question with the low numbers. Prints used to match monitor just fine. This is recent. I do not have a printer profile, nor a scanner.

This stuff can get dicey when the software doesn’t have a working space - and I’m not sure about the sRGB profile there… does that act as a working space?

When an app doesn’t have or allow a working space or a document profile then the document’s space is always your monitor space. This is bad because:

  1. Every time you reprofile your display or (gasp!) replace it, the color in all your documents might change!!

  2. The color in all your documents is limited by the gamut of your display. I’d hate that to happen if I used a laptop…

Regards,

Steve

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wingspar, do you have an update for the list? I would ask what no one has yet;

What changed?

If all was well and good from print 1 to 100 and print 101 is bad, something must have changed between 100 and 101. A gradual change, however is another issue entirely.

Was it a profile? Paper? Inks?

If you’re color correcting on a monitor that cannot reach a satisfying state of calibration, your prints WILL be tinted.

As a test you could measure the hue of the tint, find it’s 180 counterpart in Lab* and then purposefuly tint the photo that hue. Printing should get it closer to “neutral.” (Not a workaround… purely for academic reasons)

In my experience, CRT’s will just “go” one day. We calibrate once every two weeks and a monitor will calibrate fine one week and the next, it won’t hit the target. Time to replace!

Also, with no printer profile… well, it’s all up in the air. You should also determine what exactly your software is using as its working space. That is as important an issue as the printer profile in my mind.

-Brian Dieckman
Project Facilitator and Black Belt
Sony DADC Global, Terre Haute, IN