CHROMiX

Gamut estimation with paper change

Is there a way to estimate (and display) the change in gamut if a paper is changed?

We’ve just been handed a primer that has a higher L* value and is much more neutral than our present primer, and I want to be able to estimate or predict the difference in gamut.

At 11:58 AM -0700 8/18/05, SonyDADC wrote:

Is there a way to estimate (and display) the change in gamut if a paper is changed?

We’ve just been handed a primer that has a higher L* value and is much more neutral than our present primer, and I want to be able to estimate or predict the difference in gamut.

at this time it is tough.

In fact, without printing on the paper and taking a few measurements, I don’t think there is a way to estimate it. The ink/paper interaction is too tough to predict.

ColorThink Pro will draw a “skin” around a set of measurements so that you can get a gamut-size feeling without building an entire profile…

Regards,

Steve


o Steve Upton CHROMiX www.chromix.com
o (hueman) 866.CHROMiX


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Thank you, Steve.

I’m not opposed to making those prints and measurements, I only wanted to visualize it ahead of time. This particular change in our process will drasticly affect our output in the highlights and midtones.

[code] L* a* b*
Previous Primer: 83.04 -2.27 -5.23
New Primer: 89.42 -1.54 1.18
Proofing Paper: 94.58 0.11 2.14

[/code]

Yet these numbers only show one part of the equation. If it were strictly the same coating and the ink would behave exactly the same then it’s a chromatic adaptation formula that could approximate this.

You’ll find an excel sheet at bruce lindbloom’s site if you care to go into the math of doing so. If it’s not there anymore I still have what he sent me naively thinking that mortals are capable of doing this. PErsonally I just wait for Steve to come up with new things and put the math behind a fun interface.

There are ink formulation applications which also predict changes. Both Monaco/XRite and GMB have them . Way too technical for photographers though. Maybe Steve knows these programs.