CHROMiX

I need advise on Hexachrome separations

I need to separate a RGB file into Pantone Hexachrome profile, but I don’t have Pantone’s software for doing the separation. Normally, I use the MC plugin for PS which is part of GM ProfileMaker 5, but this time the profile I need to use was created with Monaco and GM plugin does not recognize it. I tried Panther ColorSync scripts and apparently it process the file correctly, but because it’s a 6 channel TIFF there’s no software that can open it, and the scripts can’t work with EPS DCS.

If anyone has an idea of how I can separate a file to 6 channels without Pantone’s SW; or how to convert a 6 channel TIFF into EPS DCS, I will appreciate a lot.

Xavier

You could obtain a separate plugin…theres one from Aurelon Software called n-color converter that allows Photoshop processing and saves a DCS file… there’s a demo here: thepowerco.com/ncolor_conver … _prd1.html

Or, if you could get the measurement data that created the Monaco Hexachrome profile you could create a new profile with ProfileMaker, then you could then use the GM plug in. Just a thought.

mike

Thanks Mike, I’ll try the plug-in. I also thought on re-build the profile with PM5 but I don’t have the measurement data, and for what I can see it’s not inside the profile like PM does. Any idea of how to get the measurement data from a Monaco profile (in case is possible)?

I did it! :bulb:
I want to share a method I found for creating a 6 channel separation without any special PS plugin or dedicated software, just MacOS X and PS CS.

First I separated the files from RGB Working Space to hexacrhome using AppleScript ColorSync scripts found on MacOS X. I edited a bit the scripts to automatically use the embed profile as source, then ask for the hexachrome profile and do the conversion using different rendering intents and best quality settings for Apple’s CMM. This results in a 6 channel TIFF, that al-thru it’s correct, basically no normal SW can open it. So, I managed to open the file forcing Photoshop to open it as “Photoshop RAW” (don’t confuse it with “Camera RAW”). You have to type the pixel dimensions of the file (which I know from the original file) and set 6 channels. Then, the file opens in negative as RGB plus 3 alpha channels, from this all you have to do is convert it to multi-channel, invert all, set the correct color definition for each channel and the correct sequence (you have to figure out what channel data corresponds to what color). I created a Photoshop action to automate the process. Finally, you have a multichannel document ready to be saved as Photoshop DCS, and that’s it!

I hope this to be useful to others. It saved me some money and as I said in a previous post, I regularly use ProfileMaker 5 plugins but some times I need to use profiles created with different software (e.g. Monaco) and this method resulted very fast (thanks Apple’s ColorSync CMM) and strait-forward after automatization.

Xavier

At 7:21 PM -0800 2/8/05, xavier_DE0 wrote:

I did it! :bulb:
I want to share a method I found for creating a 6 channel separation without any special PS plugin or dedicated software, just MacOS X and PS CS.

First I separated the files from RGB Working Space to hexacrhome using AppleScript ColorSync scripts found on MacOS X. I edited a bit the scripts to automatically use the embed profile as source, then ask for the hexachrome profile and do the conversion using different rendering intents and best quality settings for Apple’s CMM. This results in a 6 channel TIFF, that al-thru it’s correct, basically no normal SW can open it. So, I managed to open the file forcing Photoshop to open it as “Photoshop RAW” (don’t confuse it with “Camera RAW”). You have to type the pixel dimensions of the file (which I know from the original file) and set 6 channels. Then, the file opens in negative as RGB plus 3 alpha channels, from this all you have to do is convert it to multi-channel, invert all, set the correct color definition for each channel and the correct sequence (you have to figure out what channel data corresponds to what color). I created a Photoshop action to automate the process. F!
inally, you have a multichannel document ready to be saved as Photoshop DCS, and that’s it!

that’s a good idea… a nasty hack but a good idea… I’ll have to remember that one.

Regards,

Steve

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