Importance of UV on Eye One Photo

Hello,

I am going to be purchasing an Eye One Photo to created RGB print profiles for the Epson driver on a 9600 and to read Grayscale linearization patches in the Studio Print RIP. I print my black and white with Piezotones on Hanmuehle (sp?) Photo Rag 188 and color on Epson’s photo semi-gloss and double weight mat. Is the UV model of the Eye One Photo a necessary upgrade?

Thanks, Drew Harty

I believe the Hanmuehle Photo Rag 188 and Epson Photo Semigloss both have optical brighteners, not sure about the other. If they didn’t I would say go without the UV, but since they do you could go either way. Correct me if I’m wrong, but i1 Match does not offer any optical brightener correction (at the “Photo” level) and the i1 Spectro does not have a removable UV filter you can purchase separately, right?

We bought an IcColor with a UV filter as some of our papers have optical brighteners. If I had to do it over again, I would have found paper that was free of O.B.s and gone without the UV for two reasons. 1) the profiles I create with a UV filter still have a tendency to be casted in the highlights (nothing major, but I need to correct for it), and 2) TR001 and DTR004 data was measured without a UV filter. In my situation with a GMG Rip, I can create a simulation toward TR001 or DTR004 on an inkjet that is well within 1 delta E, but since the devices measure color differently, there is still a difference that I can’t effectivley account for without measureing with a non-UV device.

mike

Drew;

The Eye-One Match software does have automatic UV detection and
compensation built in to the software. Unlike ProfileMaker, you can’t
ever turn this feature off. However, we regard this software feature as
mostly comparable to a hardware filter, but because it’s software, it
has the unique flexibility to be developed and evolved as time goes on
by GretagMacbeth. The hardware filter is permanent and can’t be taken
off. There are many theories whether having a UV filter does harm or
not on non-UV material. Regardless of the these arguments, you should
always compensate for UV content in some manner (obviously) when
scanning a profile target. If you don’t know how many stocks you use
that have UV, or if it’s only a percentage, we usually recommend most
people go without the UV filter if you’re buying the Eye-One Photo.

Hope that helps?


o Rick Hatmaker, CHROMiX Worldwide Sales
o Toll Free 866.CHROMiX extension #7
o www.chromix.com
o ColorGear ColorThink ColorValet ColorSmarts ProfileCentral


On Apr 2, 2005, at 8:25 AM, drew harty wrote:

Hello,

I am going to be purchasing an Eye One Photo to created RGB print
profiles for the Epson driver on a 9600 and to read Grayscale
linearization patches in the Studio Print RIP. I print my black and
white with Piezotones on Hanmuehle (sp?) Photo Rag 188 and color on
Epson’s photo semi-gloss and double weight mat. Is the UV model of
the Eye One Photo a necessary upgrade?

Thanks, Drew Harty


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