CHROMiX

LCD Monitor Calibration Problem

I have calibrated my Samsung SMPX2370 monitor with:

  1. Monaco Profiler by Xrite.

  2. The new i1Profiler by Xrite

  3. The default profile that comes with the Samsung driver install.

Problem: With any of the above profiles: Dark shadow areas on my monitor, using sRGB as the working space, that, formerly, with an actual tube sRGB Sony display, showed little detail, now, have, on the monitor, tremendous detail. The monitor shows MUCH more “shadow detail” than an actual print that is properly honoring the sRGB source space.

Hypothesis…the backlit LCD display cannot actually reach the low luminance values of a tube sRGB display … and…profiling tools cannot help because it is the physical device.

Has anyone seen a similar issue with back lit LCD displays where sRGB is embedded in the image and printed to an accurate profile?

Questions:

  1. How old is your Samsung?

  2. What kind of printer profile are you using? Is it a generic profile supplied by Epson (or media supplier, etc.), or are you using a custom measured and generated print profile?

  3. What OS are you using?

  4. What graphic application and version are you using to apply the profiles?

First, thank you for your reply:

  1. How old is your Samsung?
    6 months, it is one of the newer back lit lcd displays

  2. What kind of printer profile are you using? Is it a generic profile supplied by Epson (or media supplier, etc.), or are you using a custom measured and generated print profile?
    I am using a profile that I built for a high speed Xerox printer. I am confident the profile is accurate.

  3. What OS are you using? Windows XP

  4. What graphic application and version are you using to apply the profiles?Photoshop CS5 and Canon Digital Photo Professional

Based on your answers I don’t see anything glaring or obvious.

What are your monitors calibration parameters? (Luminance, White Point, Gamma)

It could be that your current calibartion software does not adequately lower the luminance necessary. In a proper lower ambient viewing environment (recommended for most environments), we generally suggest a Luminance range from 80 up to ~120 cd/m2. If a monitor is too much higher than this range (again with balanced lower ambient), it could cause issues in the highlights and dark ranges. Conversely, if the monitor is below ~80 cd/m2, then you could suffer from plugging up of ranges especially in the darks & blacks.

Two top Pro-level monitor calibration products that we recommend that can allow better luminance control are ColorEyes Display Pro and basICColor Display. We sell both incidentally. You can download DEMO versions of each to test to see which gives you the best results. Both should be compatible with your device.

ColorEyes Display Pro Free 10-day DEMO: http://www.integrated-color.com/productdemo/demo.html You will need to complete the form.

basICColor Display Free 14-day DEMO: http://license.basiccolor.de/login.asp?oemId=1&language=EN You will need to Register for a free account before having access and then downloading the DEMO software.

Hope that helps. If not, lets go from there.

Sorry, I almost forgot… Here are the two products on our website.

ColorEyes Display Pro:
http://www2.chromix.com/colorgear/shop/productdetail.cxsa?toolid=1122&pid=10449

basICColor Display:
http://www2.chromix.com/colorgear/shop/productdetail.cxsa?toolid=50141&pid=10449

If I understand you correctly, your newer LCD is giving you more shadow detail than you are seeing on your prints and what you were used to on an older sRGB CRT. Is that right? Here are a couple of ideas:

  • This article describes how an LCD can open up shadow detail in some cases - especially when it is run at a higher luminance. This might be what you are seeing. We can tell you more about how to set your luminance if you need that.
    http://www.colorwiki.com/wiki/Monitors_Part_One

  • On the print end of things, I wonder if you’d see more shadow detail if you took it outside? A lot of times we find that the shadow detail that we think is not there - suddenly is there after all when we view it under brighter lighting conditions. A properly made printer profile should be able to provide good shadow detail.